in this love you are like a knife with which i explore myself.

franz kafka, in a letter to milena jasenská  (via starseas)

(Source: rabbitinthemoon, via starseas)

http://adventuresineclecticism.tumblr.com/post/95123192907/spanish-haber-shares-its-roots-with

adventuresineclecticism:

Spanish haber shares its roots with Italian avere andFrench avoir in the Latin habere, but it underwent a process called grammaticalization and lost its lexical meaning of to have.

Essentially, the modern day past participle comes from what was called the Perfect Passive Participle in…

Europeans: I drove forty minutes to the Netherlands for some groceries and then I popped into Germany to see some of my relatives before driving back home.
Americans: I was in Florida, I drove for nine hours, now I'm still in Florida.
hannifranni:

livinglanguages:

Hey guys! I got a little surprise for you! So I made this table for Slavic languages, because I recently discovered my secret love for Slavic languages, comparing words in all of them! :D
IF anything is wrong please do not criticise me and just make a suggestion (correction actually but I don’t like using this word :P) and let me know! I am SURE that there ARE mistakes, since I don’t speak any of those languages.
Making this table came to my mind because I was comparing a Slavic language which is only spoken in one of my home countries, which is not a Slavic country, and is not an official language, to Polish. 
Have fun! :D


This is beautiful

thank you you make me happy :)

hannifranni:

livinglanguages:

Hey guys! I got a little surprise for you! So I made this table for Slavic languages, because I recently discovered my secret love for Slavic languages, comparing words in all of them! :D

IF anything is wrong please do not criticise me and just make a suggestion (correction actually but I don’t like using this word :P) and let me know! I am SURE that there ARE mistakes, since I don’t speak any of those languages.

Making this table came to my mind because I was comparing a Slavic language which is only spoken in one of my home countries, which is not a Slavic country, and is not an official language, to Polish. 

Have fun! :D

This is beautiful

thank you you make me happy :)

Anonymous said: 11

"Mama" by Basta. (It’s in Russian)

Or

"Dyki Tantsi" by Ruslana (Ukrainian)

Or

"Uzbuna" by Severina (Croatian)

Or

"Erotevmenos kai Trelos" by Konstantinos Argiros (Greek)

Or

"Perdono" by Tiziano (Italian)

Or

Any Spanish Shakira song. 😋

Anonymous said: could you explain the 'vos' of argentine spanish?

spanishskulduggery:

It’s not exclusively Argentina, but vos is a different version of .

In Argentina, I’ve been told it’s almost exclusively vos and not  or Usted.

In some places, vos (which gets conjugated mostly as  with the exception of some tenses) is a more intimate form of 

It’s common in Latin America, not so much Spain from what I’ve been told.

The “voseo”, dear anon, is commonly used in the “Río de la Plata” region, namely in Argentina and Uruguay, but also in some parts of Bolivia. However, there is a little minority of “voseo” users in Colombia and the “voseo” is also commonly used in Nicaragua.

"Vos" is, in most cases, conjugated like "Vosotros", however, leaving the "i" and other letters which are present at the end of a conjugated verb in the form of "vosotros" away.

Examples:

1. “Vosotros hacéis.”

2. “Vos hacés.”

Or

1. “Vosotros tenéis.”

2. “Vos tenés.”

However, for some words the conjugated form of “tú” is used instead:

1. “Vosotros habéis.”

2. “Vos has”

Saying “Vos habés” is gramatically wrong. The dropping of a final letter also occurs in the “Imperativo”:

1. “¡[Vosotros] venid!”

2. “¡[Vos] vení!”

Or

1. “¡[Vosotros] hablad!”

2. “¡[Vos] hablá!”


So these are the basic rules, and this was a basic explanation. I hope I helped you answer your question. :)

1: Your native language.
2: Which languages you know.
3: Which languages you are learning, or want to learn.
4: Does anyone in your family speak a language that you don't?
5: Your favourite language to listen to.
6: Your least favourite language to listen to.
7: Your favourite word in your native language.
8: Your favourite word in your second language(if you know one).
9: Your favourite word in a language you don't really speak.
10: A list of your favourite words in any language.
11: A song you like in a language other than English.
12: If you could pick one language to learn automatically without having to work for it, which language would you choose?
13: Have you ever seen a whole movie in a language you don't understand?
14: A language you like, but wouldn't put the effort into learning.
15: Write a short introduction of yourself in a language other than English.

Reblog if you can speak more than 1 language.

polyglot-by-luck:

languageisthekeyforeducation:

polyglot-by-luck:

Ich mag Kartoffelpuffer.

Mit Apfelmus sind sie einfach ein Traum.

Ja!! Du bringst mich zum Lächeln!

Omg ja. Kartoffelpuffer würden jetzt garnicht mal so schlecht kommen.

(Source: polyglotbyluck, via polyglotbyluck)

spanish and italian: So THESE words are feminine and THESE words are masculine, and you ALWAYS put an adjective AFTER the noun.
french: haha i dont fuckin know man just do whatever
german: LET'S ADD A NEUTRAL NOUN HAHA
english: *shooting up in the bathroom*
gaelic: the pronounciation changes depending on the gender and what letter the word starts and ends with and hahah i dont even know good fucking luck
Polish: here have all of these consonants have fun
japanese: subject article noun article verb. too bad there's three fucking alphabets lmao hope your first language isn't western
welsh: sneeze, and chances are you've got it right. idfk
hebrew: everything [including numbers] is gendered and pretty much anything can be conjugated
arabic: there's 28 letters in the alphabet but they change shape depending on if they're at the start/middle/end of the word