modagliani said: uuui viel glück haha <3

Hahaha danke dir :)

Idiomatic Expression - un ojo de la cara

spanishskulduggery:

Literally, “an eye from the face”

Idiomatically, you use it as costar(le) un ojo de la cara “to cost (someone) an arm and a leg”, or valer un ojo de la cara “to be worth an arm and a leg”.

Sometimes it means physical effort, sometimes it means actual money. Like in…

Ru- Where? Somewhere. Anywhere. Nowhere.

jaimetalangue:

Movement in Russian is fundamental to understand. Russian makes a difference between

  • location (no movement),
  • destination (movement toward),
  • and origin (movement from).

This distinction is found in the way of starting a question with where? and answering it:

  • где

http://jaimetalangue.tumblr.com/post/97882097596/whosaprettypolyglot-whosaprettypolyglot-one

whosaprettypolyglot:

whosaprettypolyglot:

One thing we need to move away from in languages is asking people how long they’ve been learning them for, because that information means absolutely diddly squat but people use it to try and extrapolate a rough arbitrary level they should be at…

explore-blog:

TED-Ed explores how languages change and evolve. Pair with the animated history of the English language and the somewhat scandalous story of how Darwin revolutionized our understanding of why language exists

(via Open Culture)

(via languagelinguistics)

Cats of Linguists (linguisticats) | Twitter

linguisticats:

GUYS I MADE A TWITTER

it’ll mostly just be the tumblr feed, but I know several friends-of-cats aren’t on tumblr and are on twitter, so this will give them a chance to share in the joy that is CATS (cats)

(via languagelinguistics)

The new girl in my class speaks like German and Dutch mix. But it’s not German and Dutch, it’s gibberish.

An 8 year-old Dutch girl describing Danish (via linguisticsyall)

(via linguadolce)

linguaphilioist:

"Although English was once a largely homogeneous Germanic or Teutonic language, well over half its vocabulary today is derived from Latin. We began to borrow wholesale from Latin during the Middle Ages, when scholars throughout Europe wrote and spoke to one another in that language. As a result, we lost our habit of coining new words out of existing English elements and started taking words directly from Latin texts instead. Interestingly, Modern German, although sprung from the same Teutonic roots as Anglo-Saxon, has kept this ability. Where we borrowed from Latin, they formed new words out of existing German elements."

linguaphilioist:

"Although English was once a largely homogeneous Germanic or Teutonic language, well over half its vocabulary today is derived from Latin. We began to borrow wholesale from Latin during the Middle Ages, when scholars throughout Europe wrote and spoke to one another in that language. As a result, we lost our habit of coining new words out of existing English elements and started taking words directly from Latin texts instead. Interestingly, Modern German, although sprung from the same Teutonic roots as Anglo-Saxon, has kept this ability. Where we borrowed from Latin, they formed new words out of existing German elements."

(via languageramblings)

modagliani said: nee ich bin zweisprachig aufgewachsen (deutsch&kroatisch), hab englisch irgendwie "nebenbei" und mit der zeit gelernt, lerne seit zwei jahren italienisch und fang dieses jahr mit französisch an :) uui wie ist denn dein italienisch so ?

nett :) hahahah mein italienisch? Naja, so gut wie es für jemanden der fließend spanisch spricht halt sein kann :P (nicht annährend gut xD) Ja aber ich fange am 30. Auch einen Italienischkurs an also das wird schon :P

english = wi-fi
spanish = wi-fi
italian = wi-fi
french = wi-fi
polish = wi-fi
turkish = wi-fi
irish = wi-fi
danish = wi-fi
finnish = wi-fi
swedish = wi-fi
norwegian = wi-fi
czech = wi-fi
albanian = wi-fi
portuguese = wi-fi
every place on earth = wi-fi
germany = wlan